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Understanding Design/Build Remodeling: Cost Control

The Fundamental Differences Between Design/Build and Design-Bid-Build

Understanding how design build vs. design-bid-build contracts work may help you better decide the type of remodeling contractor you need—and to find one whose approach suits both your comfort level and your pocket book.

As a follow up from last week, MainStreet Design Build invites you to continue your exploration of these fundamental differences to make a decision that is just right for you.

Button 3DESIGN-BID-BUILD

Often architects and designers do not have access to construction costs. They have to rely on contractors to provide this information after the project is designed. Consequently, changes to the design are often required to meet project budgets. Because the design and build process is finalized before construction costs are determined, project delays can occur if construction documents must be modified, or if new materials have to be specified.

DESIGN BUILD

In the design-build process, the remodel project is developed around the budget from the beginning. Ideas are presented and evaluated in parallel with other work, taking into account all elements of the project, to help eliminate surprises during the build phase. Although this method does not make use of competitive bidding, it does offer an early understanding of project costs, creating more opportunity for the owner to make decisions at each stage. In addition, design-builders have access to most recent construction costs, so designs are value engineered with the most cost-effective materials and methods.

What is your preference?

A budget that is derived as a result of the design; or design that is derived as a result of the budget?

Related Posts:

Understanding the Difference Between Design Build and Design-Bid-Build

Fundamental Differences Between Each Approach: #1 To Bid or Not to Bid

Fundamental Differences Between Each Approach: #2 One vs. Multiple Contracts

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